CHAPTER 30 (continued). Wales

On Monday morning we had a look around Gloucester and then went on to Wales.

ruins of Chepstow Castle

 

ruins of Chepstow Castle

Rozie had been looking forward to Wales, making some claim upon it as it was the birthplace of her mother and our home part at the time of our marriage had been named Clyro after one of these pretty villages.

We therefore expected some of the comments when we entered Wales to the effect that the scenery was better, the weather was better and the roads were better.

Actually this was true to a certain extent, as we enjoyed the more hilly country and the wider roads. Anyhow, we dare not say a bad word about anything in Wales.

the ruins of the historical Tintern Abbey

 

Tintern Abbey

 

World Tour 1938
Monmouth

 

World Tour 1938
Jacobean house in middle of street at Monmouth

 

World Tour 1938
cathedral at Monmouth

 

World Tour 1938
haymaking in churchyard at Monmouth

At Hereford we saw the real Hereford cattle. I am wondering how many more things of this kind we have to see. We had Devon cream in Devon, Jersey buns in Jersey, Yarmouth bloaters in Yarmouth, Somerset cider in Somerset, Cornish pasties in Cornwall, Welsh rarebit to-night for tea, and I expect there will be some more items yet to come.

World Tour 1938
Lo is pleased at the discovery of Clyro in Wales

 

World Tour 1938
street scene at Clyro

 

World Tour 1938
Rozie and Lo going into the Clyro Post Office to send postcards to relatives

In the early afternoon we arrived at Clyro and there was great excitement. This was the little village we had heard so much about before we were married when we were looking for a name for our first home. We photographed the main street and also the post office. Then we went into the post office and sent letter cards home so that the postmark could be shown thereon. If there had been a decent hotel there we would have stayed the night, but we could not see one and so we went on to Llandrindod-Wells.

World Tour 1938
A village in Wales where all the buildings were rough stone

We had to follow the map here very closely as we could not pronounce the name and ask anyone whether we were on the right road. We arrived fairly early – about nine o’clock – after having had our tea on the roadside.

World Tour 1938
our daily picnic. We usually had at least one meal each day in the open air and whenever possible we selected a pretty spot beside a stream

This roadside tea is a great idea. We boiled up our little kettle which we bought at Plymouth using a primus stove which Fred Ewen (Jack’s brother) lent us. We now have jam, lemon cheese, honey, bloater paste and biscuits in a little bag we bought at one of Woolworths country stores for the sum of 3d. Then when we decide to have a tea we get cream, milk and bread from a farm house or shop. We have a little set of cups and saucers, plates, teapot and cutlery which were given to me for a birthday present in Germany. Altogether it makes a very nice outfit and we enjoy our meals in the sunshine at a very low cost.

World Tour 1938
on the lake at Llandrindod Wells in Wales

At Llandrindod-Wells I heard there was to be a Rotary lunch the next day and so we decided to stay for it. The morning was spent in seeing the town and parks and in getting my haircut, which cost the sum of 8d. and it was a very good job too!

I received a very hearty welcome at the club luncheon and one of the first questions I was asked was β€œAre you any relation to Billy Wallace, the footballer?” Strangely enough, I had been asked the same question by a man at the London Rotary Club and on this occasion the man asking the question had played against Billy in one of the games England v. Australia, and they had exchanged currencies at the close of the game. I was at the President’s table and as was expected, had to answer a great number of questions concerning New Zealand, as I was the first visitor from that country since the club had been formed.

World Tour 1938
Two Welsh views

 

World Tour 1938
Two Welsh views

After the lunch was over we started on our journey and arrived at Aberystwyth for the day. Here we received our first mail from home for what seemed like ages. The letters were dated 5th May and we got them on the 21st June. I received a bag from the post office and went in next door to have tea and read them. When I found that quota had not been beaten for the month of April I had to tell the party to keep off the roast chicken and order some baked beans on toast. On the contrary they said they would have something better as the month of May was now over and although we had not yet heard, it was sure to have been a good month, as the April figures were down. In any case, I don’t think they worried how the figures were as long as they had a good meal.

World Tour 1938
where we spent a night at Aberdovey in Wales

We had run through the sights of the town and then drove on to Aberdovey, which was reached at 9.30. Here we stayed the night in a very comfortable hotel as we did not see a farm house which appealed to us, except one, and when we made enquiries we found that one was already filled.

To-night finishes our first week of touring by car and we have travelled almost 1,000 miles. It does not seem far when I have done 500 miles in one day in New Zealand, but on this trip we spent a lot of time taking photos. And seeing the places of interest, so that a thousand miles in a week is quite a good performance.

World Tour 1938
sunset

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